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Mustang Hockey 2021-22 Registration

Jul 23, 2021 to Jan 01, 2022
Hammond, IN

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Participants 1

Guardian

Athletic Eligibility

Athletic Eligibility

A Basic Guide for Schools, Students and Parents

To Students Your high school years will provide some of the most memorable and enjoyable moments you will ever experience. Competition in interschool athletics is a once-in-a-lifetime experience, which will influence you forever. Your participation in high school athletics is dependent on your eligibility. Keep that eligibility. Read the following summary of Indiana High School Athletic Association rules which govern your participation. Review the rules with your parents/guardians. Ask questions of your principal, athletic director/s and coaches.

To Parents The value of participating in athletics has been well documented. Participants earn better grades, have better attendance and have a greater chance for success in later life than non-participants. Students must meet certain standards in order to maintain the privileges of competition. Review the following rules with your son or daughter. Your role in stressing and supporting the value of following these rules cannot be emphasized enough.

From the IHSAA the Indiana High School Athletic Association has been the governing body of high school athletics in our state since 1903. Your school is a voluntary member of the IHSAA and has agreed to follow its rules. Both your school and the IHSAA believe in equal competition among schools and the close relationship between academics and athletics. The IHSAA rules listed in this brochure are only a summary of some of the regulations affecting student eligibility. All rules are found in the IHSAA By-Laws and Articles of Incorporation publication. Your principal and athletic director/s have copies. An on-line version also is located on our website: www.ishsha.com

You are ineligible if:

1. Age you are 20 years of age prior to or on the scheduled date of the IHSAA State Finals tournament in a sport.

2. Amateurism you play under an assumed name. You accept money or merchandise directly or indirectly from athletic participation. You sign a professional contract in that sport.

3. Awards and Gifts you receive in recognition for your athletic ability any award not approved by your high school principal or the IHSAA. You use or accept merchandise as an award, prize, gift or loan or purchase such for a token sum. You accept awards, medals, recognitions, gifts and honors from colleges/universities or their alumni.

4. Conduct and Character You conduct yourself in or out of school in a way which reflects discredit on your school or the IHSAA. You create a disruptive influence on the discipline, good order, moral and educational environment in your school.

5. Enrollment you did not enroll in school during the first 15 days of a semester. You have been enrolled more than four consecutive years, or the equivalent (e.g. 8 semesters or 12 trimesters, etc.), beginning with grade 9. You have represented a high school in a sport for more than four years.

6. Illness and Injury You are absent five or more consecutive school days due to illness or injury and do not present to your principal written verification from a physician licensed to practice medicine stating that you may resume participation.

7. Participation a. During Contest Season you participate in try-outs or demonstrations of athletic ability in that sport as a prospective post-secondary school student athlete. You participate in a non-school contest that required participation during school time, without gaining approval by the school principal or his/her designee. You participate in a practice with or against players not belonging to your school. You participate in a non-school-sponsored contest without an approved waiver. You attend a non-school camp. You attend and participate in a student-clinic.

b. During School Year Out-of-Season You participate in a team sport contest as a member of a non-school team where there are more than the following number of students listed below in each sport, including incoming freshmen, who have participated the previous year in a contest as a member of their school team in that sport. Basketball - 3 Baseball - 5 Football - 6 Volleyball - 3 Softball - 5 Soccer - 6 you receive instruction in team sports from individuals who are members of your high school coaching staff (Exception: open facility).

c. During Summer you attend a non-school fall sports camp and/or clinic after Monday of Week 4 (See your athletic director for specific dates). You attend any other non-school camp and/or clinic after Monday of Week 5 (See your athletic director for specific dates).

8. Practice you have not completed the required number of separate days of organized practice in your sport under the direct supervision of the high school coaching staff in your sport preceding participation in a contest.

9. Scholarship you did not pass 70% of the full credit subjects or the equivalent that a student can take in your previous grading period. Semester grades take precedence. You are not currently passing 70% of the full credit subjects or the equivalent that a student can take.

10. Consent and Release Certificate You do not have the completed certificate on file with your principal each school year, between May 1 and your first practice.

11. Transfer you transfer from one school to another primarily for athletic reasons. You were not enrolled in your present high school your last semester or at a junior high school from which your high school receives its students unless —

a. You are entering the 9th grade for the first time.

b. You are transferring from a school district or territory with a bona fide move by your parents.

c. You are a ward of the court.

d. You are an orphan.

e. You transfer to reside with a parent.

f. Your former school closed.

g. Your former school is not an IHSAA member school and is not accredited by the state accrediting agency in the state where the school is located.

h. Your transfer was pursuant to school board mandate for redistricting.

i. You enrolled and/or attended, in error, a wrong school.

j. You transferred from a correctional school.

k. You are emancipated.

l. You did not participate in any contests as a representative of another school during the preceding 365 days.

m. You return to an IHSAA member school from a non-member school and reside with the same parent/s or guardian/s.

n. You transfer to a member boarding school with a corresponding move from the residence of your parent/s or you transfer from a member boarding school with a corresponding move to the residence of your parent/s.

o. You are a qualified foreign exchange student attending under an approved CSIET program, who has attended a member school for less than one year.

12. Undue Influence You have been influenced by any person to secure you as a student or one or both parents or guardians as residents.

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Coach & Player Locker Room Agreement

Team Policies

It is the intention of this program to promote fair play and respect for all participants within the Munster Mustang Hockey Organization (MMHO). The following team policies and code of conduct have been adopted by the MMHO Board of Directors for the 2020-2021 hockey season. Our intentions are to always strive to develop and maintain a first-class organization. One that all players, parents, coaches, and alumni can always be proud of. We expect our players to present themselves as ambassadors to not only the sport of hockey but to the Munster Mustang Hockey Organization. It is expected that all read and understand the Team Policies and the Participant’s Code of Conduct and continue to observe and follow all the principles within the Code throughout the year.

  1. Captains and Assistant Captains

The coaching staff will appoint captains.

 

  1. Attendance

Attendance to all team functions is mandatory. Players are responsible for knowing the team schedule. This includes fundraising events, community service events, practices, and games. Each player is responsible for organizing their individual schedules to ensure that they do not miss any team functions. Exceptions will only be made in case of an illness, important school functions (academic only), or excessive homework. It is the player’s responsibility to notify the coaching staff prior to any player missing a team function, not the parent or another player.

Punishment:

1st offense- sit 1 period

2nd offense- sit 2 period

3rd offense- sit 1 game

 

 

 

  1. Practices

Players will be asked to arrive at the rink for practices a minimum of 45 minutes prior to taking the ice. The coaches can change this based on their ice time and other issues that may come up. All players should be in full equipment, ready to take the ice 5 minutes prior to practice. If a player does not have appropriate attire, they will be asked to leave the ice until appropriate attire has been obtained. If you need an equipment repair or your skates sharpened this should be done in enough time to ensure you make it to practice on time. If a player knows that they will be late for practice, he MUST call the coaches prior to practice. All players are required to bring gym clothes and running shoes to all practices. Note: When the coach blows the whistle, it indicates all puck play ceases, anyone found shooting pucks or not skating in for instructions, will be asked to either sit on the bench or leave practice, at the coach’s discretion. This is not only disruptive to the team but is a safety issue.

Punishment:

Exercises, suicides, extra skating (Coaches determine)

 

  1. Games

All players must arrive at the rink a minimum of 1 hour before game time (only exception are Friday night away games).  Players must be in the locker room 45 minutes prior to the start of the game. The captains will lead the team in pre-game warm-ups. All players are required to bring gym clothes and running shoes to all games. If for any reason the player cannot make it to the game on time, the coaches MUST be notified of the reason. It is the player’s responsibility to be well rested, well fed, and all his/her equipment is in working order so he may perform at the level we expect as a hockey program. Coaches will enter locker room 10 minutes prior to game time for pre-game talk all players must be dressed.

Punishment:

1st offense- sit 1 period of a game

Multiple offenses- Coaches determine punishment

ICE TIME

Ice time is earned and not equal. The coaches will determine the amount of ice time for each player based on what they feel is best for this hockey club and to ensure that the team is competitive with an emphasis on player safety in all games. Ice time will never be discussed after games, and if the player wants to talk to the coach, he may do so at the next practice behind closed doors. If the player is not playing, the parents should ask him first, as he should know the reason why.

 

Locker Room Rules

Everyday

  • Your stuff stays in your cubicle, minor exception can be goalie pads
  • Nothing hung from piping or support structure
  • Nothing in Shower and Bathroom Area
  • No wet towels balled up or on the floor or on bare wood, they should be taken home or hung up to dry
  • Door can be open when changing, with fans on
  • No bags, equipment or clothes on the floor (everything should be in locker)
  • No metal blades directly on wood of locker, use skate guards or a pad
  • Sticks in rack (not at your locker location)
  • Garbage in garbage cans (after practice or game)
  • No food garbage left in room, ever
  • Locker Room never left open (loss of key)
    • Person assigned to cleaning that day/week should be the last one out
    • With 25 Players, should only have to do this twice a year
  • Dehumidifier always on

 

Cleaning Schedule will be posted

Players should come early and/or stay late to clean.

  • Weekly
    • Shower Area Mopped
    • Rubber swept then mopped
    • Garbage Out
    • Change water in dehumidifier
    • Last event on Saturday or Sunday Night
      • Captains should look for JV or Varsity, which is last event
  • Bi-Weekly
    • Full Cleaning, All clothes and equipment and bags out of room - Everything!
    • Mopping floors, including shower and bathroom
    • Wiping down walls
    • Wiping down lockers
    • Refrigerator cleaned
    • Fan on for several hours
    • Vacuum carpet
    • Remind people to bring their bags (and equipment) to the next game on Team APP.

 

Munster Hockey

           
             

Locker Room Cleaning Schedule

         
             

Cleaning shall be done by an assigned Mustang Player on the last event of the weekend, or week, if there are no weekend events

             

Week Ending

Responsibility

         
             

Oct. 3rd

           

Oct. 10th

           

Oct. 17th

           

Oct. 24th

           

Oct. 31st

           

Nov. 7th

           

Nov. 14th

           

Nov. 21st

           

Nov. 28th

           

Dec. 5th

           

Dec. 12th

           

Dec. 19th

           

Dec. 26th

           

Jan. 2nd

           

Jan. 9th

           

Jan. 16th

           

Jan. 23rd

           

Jan. 30th

           

Feb. 6th

           

Feb. 13th

           

Feb. 20th

           

Feb. 27th

           

Mar. 6th

           

Mar. 13th

           

Mar. 20th

           

Mar. 27th

           

Apr. 3rd

           

Apr. 10th

           

Apr. 17th

           

Apr. 24th

           

May 1st

           

May 8th

           

May 15th

           

May 22nd

           

May 29th

           

Jun. 5th

           

General

  • These rules go for the Spring and Summer as well
  • Coaches will make schedule in Spring and Summer, miss schedule, loss of LR privilege

4.2 PRE-GAME DRESS CODE

The first impression is the one that lasts. The game dress code is as follows:

1. Shirt and ties are to be worn for home and away games. Pants MUST be pulled up over the hips. All shirts MUST be tucked into the pants.

2. Munster warm-ups, if issued, are to be worn 45 prior to games. No jeans, slippers, or flip flops of any kind

3. Only hats or stocking caps with the Mustangs logo are permitted. Hats are to be worn front side only.

Punishment:

1st Offense- Sit 1 period of that game

2nd Offense- Sit 1 game

3rd Offense- Sit 3 games

4.3 GAME DRESS CODE

All players are expected to wear the Munster Mustang game uniform at all times. Jerseys are expected to be washed and presentable. Any loose numbers, crests or nameplates must be fixed in a timely manner. All socks must match the game jersey worn for that game. Any player that forgets their jersey will not dress for that game. The player is responsible for making sure his/her equipment is safe, has a mouth guard for all games and neck guards when required. Players that do not comply will not be allowed on the ice till equipment is safe and/or safety items are properly in use.

5. Social Media

As a member of the Munster Mustangs, the emphasis of a Social Media post should always be one leaving a positive reflection upon yourself and the club. Remember that social media posts can live forever. Even if an athlete/member deletes a post, it was visible at a moment in time, and in that moment, anyone could have taken a screenshot. These seemingly deleted posts can resurface to haunt, taunt or otherwise damage the athlete’s and club’s image. The repercussions of questionable posts can be severe. Online taunting, foul language, ridiculing, threatening of other teams, players, refs, or coaches, is prohibited and will result in player or parent suspension and/or removal from the club.

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Concussion Protocol and Cardiac Arrest

Concussion facts: A concussion is a brain injury that affects how your brain works. A concussion is caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body. A concussion can happen even if you haven’t been knocked out. If you think you have a concussion, you should not return to play on the day of the injury and not until a health care professional says you are OK to return to play.

What are the symptoms of a concussion? Concussion symptoms differ with each person and with each injury, and they may not be noticeable for hours or days. Common symptoms include:

Headache, Confusion, Difficulty remembering or paying attention, Balance problems or dizziness, Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy Feeling irritable, more emotional, or “down” Nausea or vomiting, Bothered by light or noise, Double or blurry vision, Slowed reaction time, Sleep problems, Loss of consciousness During recovery, exercising or activities that involve a lot of concentration (such as studying, working on the computer, or playing video games) may cause concussion symptoms to reappear or get worse.

What should I do if I think I have a concussion? DON’T HIDE IT. REPORT IT.

Ignoring your symptoms and trying to “tough it out” often makes symptoms worse. Tell your coach, parent, and athletic trainer if you think you or one of your teammates may have a concussion. Don’t let anyone pressure you into continuing to practice or play with a concussion.

GET CHECKED OUT. Only a health care professional can tell if you have a concussion and when it’s OK to return to play. Sports have injury timeouts and player substitutions so that you can get checked out and the team can perform at its best. The sooner you get checked out, the sooner you may be able to safely return to play.

TAKE CARE OF YOUR BRAIN. A concussion can affect your ability to do schoolwork and other activities. Most athletes with a concussion get better and return to sports, but it is important to rest and give your brain time to heal. A repeat concussion that occurs while your brain is still healing can cause long-term problems that may change your life forever.

How can I help prevent a concussion? Every sport is different, but there are steps you can take to protect yourself. Follow your coach’s rules for safety and the rules of the sport. Practice good sportsmanship at all times.

If you think you have a concussion: Don’t hide it. Report it. Take time to recover. It’s better to miss one game than the whole season.

For more information, visit www.cdc.gov/Concussion.  

April 2013

 

HEADS UP CONCUSSION IN SPORTS

A FACT SHEET FOR HIGH SCHOOL

What is a concussion?

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury. Concussions are caused by a bump or blow to the head. Even a “ding,” “getting your bell rung,” or what seems to be a mild bump or blow to the head can be serious. You can’t see a concussion. Signs and symptoms of concussion can show up right after the injury or may not appear or be noticed until days or weeks after the injury. If your child reports any symptoms of concussion, or if you notice the symptoms yourself, seek medical attention right away.

 

What are the signs and symptoms of a concussion?

If your child has experienced a bump or blow to the head during a game or practice, look for any of the following signs of a concussion:

How can you help your child prevent a concussion or other serious brain injury?

Ensure that they follow their coach’s rules for safety and the rules of the sport. Encourage them to practice good sportsmanship at all times. Make sure they wear the right protective equipment for their activity. Protective equipment should fit properly and be well maintained. Wearing a helmet is a must to reduce the risk of a serious brain injury or skull fracture. – However, helmets are not designed to prevent concussions. There is no “concussion-proof” helmet. So, even with a helmet, it is important for kids and teens to avoid hits to the head.

What should you do if you think your child has a concussion?

SEEK MEDICAL ATTENTION RIGHT AWAY. A health care professional will be able to decide how serious the concussion is and when it is safe for your child to return to regular activities, including sports.

KEEP YOUR CHILD OUT OF PLAY. Concussions take time to heal. Don’t let your child return to play the day of the injury and until a health care professional says it’s OK. Children who return to play too soon—while the brain is still healing— risk a greater chance of having a repeat concussion. Repeat or later concussions can be very serious. They can cause permanent brain damage, affecting your child for a lifetime.

TELL YOUR CHILD’S COACH ABOUT ANY PREVIOUS CONCUSSION. Coaches should know if your child had a previous concussion. Your child’s coach may not know about a concussion your child received in another sport or activity unless you tell the coach.

If you think your teen has a concussion: Don’t assess it yourself. Take him/her out of play. Seek the advice of a health care professional.

It’s better to miss one game than the whole season.

April 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST

A Fact Sheet for Student Athletes

 

FACTS Sudden cardiac arrest can occur even in athletes who are in peak shape. Approximately 500 deaths are attributed to sudden cardiac arrest in athletes each year in the United States. Sudden cardiac arrest can affect all levels of athletes, in all sports, and in all age levels. The majority of cardiac arrests are due to congenital (inherited) heart defects. However, sudden cardiac arrest can also occur after a person experiences an illness which has caused an inflammation to the heart or after a direct blow to the chest. Once a cardiac arrest occurs, there is very little time to save the athlete, so identifying those at risk before the arrest occurs is a key factor in prevention.

WARNING SIGNS There may not be any noticeable symptoms before a person experiences loss of consciousness and a full cardiac arrest (no pulse and no breathing). Warning signs can include a complaint of:

• Chest Discomfort

• Unusual Shortness of Breath

• Racing or Irregular Heartbeat

• Fainting or Passing Out

EMERGENCY SIGNS – Call EMS (911) If a person experiences any of the following signs, call EMS (911) immediately:

• If an athlete collapses suddenly during competition

• If a blow to the chest from a ball, puck or another player precedes an athlete’s complaints of any of the warning signs of sudden cardiac arrest

• If an athlete does not look or feel right and you are just not sure

 

 

 

 

How can I help prevent a sudden cardiac arrest? Daily physical activity, proper nutrition, and adequate sleep are all important aspects of life- long health. Additionally, you can assist by:

• Knowing if you have a family history of sudden cardiac arrest (onset of heart disease in a family member before the age of 50 or a sudden, unexplained death at an early age)

• Telling your health care provider during your pre-season physical about any unusual symptoms of chest discomfort, shortness of breath, racing or irregular heartbeat, or feeling faint, especially if you feel these symptoms with physical activity

• Taking only prescription drugs that are prescribed to you by your health care provider

• Being aware that the inappropriate use of prescription medications or energy drinks can increase your risk

• Being honest and reporting symptoms of chest discomfort, unusual shortness of breath, racing or irregular heartbeat, or feeling faint

What should I do if I think I am developing warning signs that may lead to sudden cardiac arrest?

1. Tell an adult – your parent or guardian, your coach, your athletic trainer or your school nurse

2. Get checked out by your health care provider

3. Take care of your heart

4. Remember that the most dangerous thing you can do is to do nothing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST

A Fact Sheet for Parents

 

FACTS Sudden cardiac arrest is a rare, but tragic event that claims the lives of approximately 500 athletes each year in the United States. Sudden cardiac arrest can affect all levels of athletes, in all sports, and in all age levels. The majority of cardiac arrests are due to congenital (inherited) heart defects. However, sudden cardiac arrest can also occur after a person experiences an illness which has caused an inflammation to the heart or after a direct blow to the chest.

WARNING SIGNS There may not be any noticeable symptoms before a person experiences loss of consciousness and a full cardiac arrest (no pulse and no breathing).

Warning signs can include a complaint of:

• Chest Discomfort

• Unusual Shortness of Breath

• Racing or Irregular Heartbeat

• Fainting or Passing Out

EMERGENCY SIGNS – Call EMS (911) If a person experiences any of the following signs, call EMS (911) immediately:

• If an athlete collapses suddenly during competition

• If a blow to the chest from a ball, puck or another player precedes an athlete’s complaints of any of the warning signs of sudden cardiac arrest

• If an athlete does not look or feel right and you are just not sure

Developed and Reviewed by the Indiana Department of Education’s Sudden Cardiac Arrest Advisory Board (1-7-15)

 

 

 

 

 

 

How can I help my child prevent a sudden cardiac arrest? Daily physical activity, proper nutrition, and adequate sleep are all important aspects of life- long health. Additionally, parents can assist student athletes prevent a sudden cardiac arrest by: (onset of heart disease in a family member before the age of 50 or a sudden, unexplained death at an early age)

• Ensuring your child has a thorough pre- season screening exam prior to participation in an organized athletic activity

• Asking if your school and the site of competition has an automatic defibrillator (AED) that is close by and properly maintained

• Learning CPR yourself

• Ensuring your child is not using any non-prescribed stimulants or performance enhancing drugs

• Being aware that the inappropriate use of prescription medications or energy drinks can increase risk

• Encouraging your child to be honest and report symptoms of chest discomfort, unusual shortness of breath, racing or irregular heartbeat, or feeling faint

What should I do if I think my child has warning signs that may lead to sudden cardiac arrest?

• Ensuring your child knows about any family history of sudden cardiac arrest

1. Tell previous events or family history

2. Keep your child out of play

3. Seek medical attention right away

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONCUSSION and SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST ACKNOWLEDGEMENT AND SIGNATURE FORM FOR PARENTS AND STUDENT ATHLETES

 

Student Athlete’s Name (Please Print): ____________________________________

Sport Participating In (Current and Potential): _______________________________

School: __________________________________Grade: ____________________

 

IC 20-34-7 and IC 20-34-8 require schools to distribute information sheets to inform and educate student athletes and their parents on the nature and risk of concussion, head injury and sudden cardiac arrest to student athletes, including the risks of continuing to play after concussion or head injury. These laws require that each year, before beginning practice for an interscholastic sport, a student athlete and the student athlete’s parents must be given an information sheet, and both must sign and return a form acknowledging receipt of the information to the student athlete’s coach.

IC 20-34-7 states that an interscholastic student athlete, in grades 5-12, who is suspected of sustaining a concussion or head injury in a practice or game, shall be removed from play at the time of injury and may not return to play until the student athlete has received a written clearance from a licensed health care provider trained in the evaluation and management of concussions and head injuries, and at least twenty-four hours have passed since the injury occurred.

IC 20-34-8 states that a student athlete who is suspected of experiencing symptoms of sudden cardiac arrest shall be removed from play and may not return to play until the coach has received verbal permission from a parent or legal guardian for the student athlete to return to play. Within twenty-four hours, this verbal permission must be replaced by a written statement from the parent or guardian.

Parent/Guardian - please read the attached fact sheets regarding concussion and sudden cardiac arrest and ensure that your student athlete has also received and read these fact sheets. After reading these fact sheets, please ensure that you and your student athlete sign this form, and have your student athlete return this form to his/her coach.

As a student athlete, I have received and read both of the fact sheets regarding concussion and sudden cardiac arrest. I understand the nature and risk of concussion and head injury to student athletes, including the risks of continuing to play after concussion or head injury, and the symptoms of sudden cardiac arrest.

(Signature of Student Athlete) _______________________________________

(Date) __________________________

I, as the parent or legal guardian of the above named student, have received and read both of the fact sheets regarding concussion and sudden cardiac arrest. I understand the nature and risk of concussion and head injury to student athletes, including the risks of continuing to play after concussion or head injury, and the symptoms of sudden cardiac arrest.

(Signature of Parent or Guardian) ________________________________________

(Date) ____________________________

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Parent Code of Conduct

MUNSTER MUSTANG HOCKEY ORGANIZATION

PARENTS CODE OF CONDUCT

It is the intention of this program to promote fair play and respect for all participants within the Munster Mustang Hockey Organization (MMHO). It is expected that all parents of the MMHO read and understand the Parent’s Code of Conduct and continue to observe and follow all the principles within the Code throughout the year.

1. I will encourage my child to play by the rules and to resolve conflict without resorting to hostility.

2. I will remember that children learn by example. I will applaud good plays by both my child’s team and their opponents. I will not be critical of, or embarrass any player, including opposing players.

3. I will never question the official’s judgment or honesty in public. I recognize that officials are being developed in the same manner as players.

4. I will respect and show appreciation for the volunteers who give their time to hockey for my child.

5. I will never yell, taunt, threaten, or inflict physical violence upon any player, coach, official, or spectator at any youth hockey activity. I will refrain from the use of abusive or vulgar language, racial, ethnic, or gender-related slurs at any time at the rink or any youth hockey function. I will support all efforts to remove verbal and physical abuse from youth hockey games.

6. I will leave the coaching to the coaching staff. I will encourage my child to play in a manner consistent with the team’s strategy or plans.

7. I will not throw objects of any kind on the ice, or lean over and pound on the glass.

8. I will communicate all and any concerns regarding inappropriate behavior to the Board of Directors.

9. I will insist that my child plays in a safe and healthy environment. I will support a sports environment that is free of alcohol, drugs, or tobacco and I will refrain from their use at all youth sports events.

10. If I have an issue that I would like to discuss with the coach, I will wait 24 hours after a game for a cooling down period. I will call the coach the following day and set up a meeting that is convenient for both parties. If there are any issues that can’t be resolved, then I am aware that the board may be involved to act as a mediator until the problem is solved.

11. I will remember that my child plays hockey for his or her enjoyment, not mine.

I have read and understand the above Code of Conduct, and agree to abide by its guidelines at all team activities. I understand that if I do not follow this Code of Conduct, I may be asked to leave the activity (such as a game or meeting) or I may be asked to withdraw my child from the team.


Please retain this page for your records and sign the Acknowledgment page (pg. 11) to confirm you have read and agree to abide by the Parent’s Code of Conduct.

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Participant Code of Conduct

Participate Code of Conduct

To be read and signed by you as a participant of the Munster Mustang Hockey Organization ice hockey team.

1. No swearing or abusive language on the bench, in the rink, or at any team function.

2. No lashing out at any official no matter what the call is. The coaching staff will handle all matters pertaining to officiating.

3. Anyone who receives a penalty will skate directly to the penalty box.

4. Fighting will not be tolerated. Fighting will result in an appearance before a Discipline Committee.

5. There will be no drinking of alcohol, smoking, chewing tobacco or use of illegal substance at time.

6. I will conduct myself in a mature and respectable manner at all facilities (ice rink, hotel, restaurant, etc.) during all team functions.

7. Any Player or team official who cannot abide by these rules or violates them will be subject to further disciplinary action.

8. I will abide by the rules and regulations enforced by the Mustang Hockey Organization and my school.

9. I will complete the educational requirements established by my school to remain academically eligible for athletic participation.

This Player Code of Conduct is used in conjunction with the Code of Conduct indicated in the Constitution and By-Law of the Munster Mustang Hockey Organization. I have read and understand the above Code of Conduct, and agree to abide by its guidelines at all team activities. I understand that if I do not follow this Code of Conduct, I may be asked to leave the activity (such as a game or practice).

Please retain this page for your records and sign the acknowledgment page (pg. 11) to confirm you have read through and agree to abide by the Team Policies and Participant’s Code of Conduct.

 

MUSTANG COACH’S HOCKEY TEAM GUIDELINES

1. RESPECT – We must have respect for all coaches, players, referees, parents, and especially the other team. Yelling at teammates or referees will not be tolerated, let the coaches handle that. Respect others on and off the ice.

2. DISCIPLINE – You must stay disciplined. Make sure you follow the game plan. Stay focused on your studies and keep your grades up. Your grades affect your eligibility to play hockey. You are responsible for your actions on and off the ice. Don’t do anything irresponsible – you will lose ice time. Make the right decisions – if something seems wrong, IT IS!

3. BE ORGANIZED – Make sure your school homework is complete. Make sure you know when and where the game is to be played. Be at practice at least 30 minutes prior to taking the ice. Arrive at least 1 hour before the start of a game. If you are not going to be on time or will be absent, it is your responsibility to let the coaches know – not your mother, father or guardian. Excused absences are sickness or death. Do not schedule dentist or doctor appointments on practice days. Repeat offenders will lose ice time. Remember You Represent Mustang Hockey. Make sure your skates are sharpened, bring two hockey sticks, bring clean hockey jerseys on hangers and socks, and make sure all of your equipment is in good condition on game days.

4. HEALTHY HABITS – If you are hurt, we need to know where, and if you are seeing a doctor we need a release form to continue playing. If you are taking medications, we need to know. If you have breathing problems and need an inhaler, we need to know. If you are allergic to any medicine, we need to know.

The use or possession of alcohol, tobacco or illegal drugs of any kind will not be tolerated. If you get caught you will be brought before the Board of Directors and there will consequences. Repeat offenders will be removed from the team. Respect your body and be disciplined enough to stay away from peer pressure and temptation. Make sure you are eating correctly and keep yourself hydrated. Adequate sleep is the key for body recovery.

These are some basic rules to follow to make the season go smoother for all of us. We need everyone to abide by them. If you have a question – ASK!! Whether it is about hockey or life in general, just ASK. If no one asks questions, we think you understand and we move on to the next thing. We build on concepts and systems, but if you don’t understand a part of it – it won’t work!

If you have a problem with a coach about playing time, approach and discuss to coaches first. If we can’t work it out you can have a parent or board member meet with us. All I ask is that you be honest with yourself first. The secret to success is all of us being on the same page. We are all striving for the same goals, to make you the best player you can be and if you get the chance - to be ready to play at the next level of hockey. We want to make this a fun, challenging, learning experience for all. Have a great season and let’s go get some trophies!

Coaching Staff

Please retain this page for your records and sign the acknowledgment page (pg. 11) to confirm you have read through the Coach’s Guidelines.

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MIDAM COVID-19 GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS

 

• Cloth face coverings are recommended

• Staff, participants, and anyone else in attendance should stay home if sick

• Use tools to self-screen before arriving at the event

• Spectators are discouraged unless necessary for transportation

• Individuals 65 or older or those in high-risk categories should not attend • Provide hand sanitizer and supplies that can be used to help prevent the spread of germs

• Consult local public health officials about plans for reopening

• Activities should be in line with state and federal guidelines, including social distancing measures

CONTACT SPORTS • Please refer to Executive Order 20-35 for requirements to operate games, leagues, and tournaments o The organizations at these links have prepared guidance for resuming amateur sports that may be helpful in preparing COVID response plans:

https://aiha-assets.sfo2.digitaloceanspaces.com/AIHA/resources/Reopening-Guidance-forAmateur-Sports_GuidanceDocument.pdf https://www.aspenprojectplay.org/return-to-play

EMPLOYERS, LEAGUE DIRECTORS, AND FACILITY PERSONNEL • Rosters with contact information should be maintained to support local public health contact tracing efforts if exposures occur

• Supply training for staff on social distancing, sanitation, cleaning hands often, and respecting space while talking with players and families

• Staff should stay home if they are sick • Frequently touched surfaces should be cleaned regularly

• If anyone arriving at the practice displays symptoms, they must be sent home

• Require sign-in sheets and gather contact information for participants if a positive case of COVID-19 is reported

• Open gates to prevent touching

• Scores should be kept in a way that prevents touching

• Display signs that encourage social distancing and frequent handwashing and sanitizing

• Limit the use of indoor spaces and keep locker room and shower areas closed PARTICIPANTS

• Sanitizer should be provided, and participants are encouraged to clean hands often

• Each player should bring their own necessary gear and equipment. Shared gear should be sanitized between users with a CDC or health department recommended solution

• Handshakes, team huddles, and sharing of drinks, seeds, gum, etc., are not permitted FACILITIES

• Stagger start times to limit gatherings and the amount of individuals present at the same time

• Each field, court, or other facility should be limited to the social gathering requirements

• Online sign-ups and in-person communication should take place where possible

• Do not provide congregation areas or playgrounds near fields

• Bleacher seating should either be removed or taped off

• Families should sit together with at least 6 feet between other groups Example plans may be found at: www.in.gov/backontrack/industryguidelines.htm

 

Guidance document for Indiana

https://aiha-assets.sfo2.digitaloceanspaces.com/AIHA/resources/Reopening-Guidance-for-Amateur-Sports_GuidanceDocument.pdf

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